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Aymara Hip Hop

 A quick collection of links about Aymara hip hop, which was mainly active during the life of Abraham Bohorquez who is considered one of the founders of this type of music. During the time of Evo Morales´s government it then seemed to fade a bit as maybe it´s major impetus was the time leading up to the massive mobilisations which brought Evo´s party MAS to power, but there are various writings about it.

http://upsidedownworld.org/archives/bolivia/rapping-in-aymara-bolivian-hip-hop-as-an-instrument-of-struggle/

https://rebelion.org/el-rap-en-aymara-el-hip-hop-boliviano-como-instrumento-de-la-lucha/

Known as Wayna Rap or Nacion Rap, it does manage to fuse a lot of sounds I love but Abraham´s girlfriend Nina Uma does mention it was certainly not a feminist movement for the most part, and it was not linked via a big industry so it could spread to other countries or continents, so remained limited to the El Alto area. Fortunately there are also female artists like Uma herself and Sdenka Suxo Cadena who do bring in anti patriarchal and even anarchist topics.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrMuMoWEKlE The film about the life of Abraham Bohorquez and his seminal band Ukamau y ké, which fused hip hop with andean instruments and a strong anti capitalist, anti colonial viewpoint that brought the aymara language and traditions to the forefront.



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